Read the D**n Directions

It helps if you follow the recipe

Hello Internet and welcome to another addition of My Life as a Home Brewer. Don’t forget to like, follow, reblog, and share on your favorite social media platform. Let’s get to it.

What’s Happening Now

The brown ale is done and tastes amazing. I know, I know I always say that I don’t like brown ales; yet, I like the Bofo Brown Ale in my Thanksgiving Beer Review and I like this one. Maybe my taste buds are changing. I still prefer an IPA to anything.

If you remember in my Watch for the Over Boil entry we added maple syrup to the batch during the boil. I can’t taste the syrup in the beer and I don’t know if that had anything to do with me liking the beer. I think we should have added the maple syrup to the batch during the fermenting stage instead of the boil, but hindsight is always 20/20. Still, it’s a great beer.

We have almost wrapped up the six-pack gifts (pun intended). I can’t wait to see the look on my family’s faces when they get beer for Christmas. I think the six-pack will have our stout, brown ale, and the IPA. The hefeweizen is still fermenting and our family Christmas was moved up to this weekend. We will see if we can get it bottled in time, but if we can’t we still have other beers to use.

Make sure you read the directions for your beer recipe. When people ask me how hard it is to home-brew I usually tell them something along the lines of, “If you can bake a cake, you can make beer. It’s all about following the recipe when you’re starting out.” Well, apparently I can’t follow my own advice while making a hefeweizen.

First, the water was supposed to be heated to 152 degrees, then taken off the burner to allow grains to steep for 20 minutes. Next, I brought the water back up to boil for an hour. What was supposed to happen was the steep for 20 minutes, bring the water back up to 160 degrees, take it off again, add dry malt and steep the bag of grains for 20 more minutes. I didn’t realize this until dad said something nearly 30 minutes into the boil. We then took it off the burner, added the malt and put the grains back in for the remaining 20 minutes.

The boil was back on after the steep. We added the hops and liquid malt at the proper time and finished out the batch without any more issues. We brought the temperature down from 212 degrees to the appropriate 76 in a matter of a few minutes and immediately dumped the batch into the fermenting bucket. To do this we just poured ice straight into batch to get the recommended final amount and it cooled quickly. I recommend this method for cooling the wort. Just make sure you start with less than the final amount or you will water it down.

I think the beer will turn out okay regardless of the mixed up steps during the boil. I’m not sure how important it was to follow the steps perfectly, but we will find out in a few weeks. I’ll make sure to report how the beer looks and tastes.

Hey, Did You Know?

This week’s Hey, Did You Know? will be a short one and consist of a tip we learned last week. At the tap room where we buy our brewing supplies the proprietor told us to wrap the fermenting bucket with a heating pad and a towel. This was a great idea because we heat with wood and our house temperature fluctuates throughout the day. This way the beer will stay at a consistent temperature during the most critical point of the process, fermenting.

We used an old electric heating pad, a bath towel, and some yarn. It works great and the yeast are going crazy in there. It’s fun to sit and listen to the CO2 bleeder. Just make sure that your heating pad is set to its lowest setting.

 

More from My Life as a Home Brewer

Six Packs for Christmas

Thanksgiving Beer

Drinking and Politics

 

My Unadulterated Opinion

This week’s flavor comes from Christian Moerlein and it’s their Barbarossa. According to Christian Moerlein, the beer is based off of Frederick I, Emperor of Germany, also known as Barbarossa. The legend says he never died and still lives in an enchanted cavern until the ravens cease to fly, which will mark his triumphant return. The label of the bottle has a king with an enormous red beard being served a giant goblet of beer. Nice touch.

The beer’s classification is a double-dark lager and it hits the mark. The beer is crisp, with a white head and a light body weight. The color is dark amber with a tinge of red. The dark malt used in this beer is savory and sweet. It balances well with the hops and no one flavor commands your attention. The beer changes as it moves across the palate. The complexity of this beer is great and I love it. Well done Christian Moerlein and here’s to you Emperor Barbarossa. I’ll be looking for your triumphant return.

Thanks for reading this entry of My Life as a Home Brewer. I had fun and hope you did too. Make sure to like, follow, reblog, and share on social media. I look forward to the next entry on December 23rd, 2014. Until then, Prost!

Featured Image Credit Craft Beer Explorer